What is community media?

Community media can be in print, broadcast, or online, and it may be published in local languages. Community newspapers have a long history in some contexts, where limited printing quantities and volunteer writers and editors contribute to making publications available at reasonable prices.

Community radio stations are emerging as a model to promote local development and civic awareness. This is facilitated by liberalizing licensing systems and increasing the capacity to bear technical costs. The number of community television stations is also on the rise, and in some countries, national broadcasting stations play a community role by broadcasting content produced by or targeting specific local communities.

What is the importance of community media? The significance of community media and radio lies in addressing and conveying societal concerns, especially in areas not extensively covered by mainstream media. While official and commercial media exist, community media, primarily relying on volunteers, are non-profit and are still relatively new in the Arab world, despite significant progress in the West.

Community media: reality and potential Can we talk about community media in light of its current state globally? The current reality indicates a lack of a clear model for this crucial media, especially considering ongoing discussions about developmental media, the marginalization of regions, decentralization, and insufficient coverage of “vulnerable” groups by public media.

In fact, there are several media outlets that share some characteristics of community media, especially in terms of content, targeting specific demographics or areas, or in certain management forms. However, many have not evolved to be truly community-oriented.

Nevertheless, radio or community media networks have contributed and continue to contribute to spreading the concept of community media. This is achieved through organizing conferences for the World or regional Community Radio Associations and participating in creating “community” radios in various regions. They have trained a large number of citizens, Syrian refugees, and Iraqis in “citizen journalism” concepts.

Most of these radios have local community management boards, and some volunteers participate in producing their programs. They receive funding from universities and support from international organizations, aiming not for profit. Some contribute to training individuals from these communities in journalism, and their programs are characterized by community service.

Discussing the development of community media in Jordan is not a luxury but a necessity. This media has contributed and continues to contribute to the development of democracy, either by giving citizens a voice or by focusing on groups that do not receive sufficient coverage.

In conclusion, discussing the development of community media is not a luxury but a necessity. This media has contributed and continues to contribute to the development of democracy, either by giving citizens a voice or by focusing on groups that do not receive sufficient coverage. It highlights and reflects the diversity and plurality in society, filling a significant gap in the coverage of traditional media, which usually do not give enough attention to specific audiences or regions. It allows citizens to define their interests, priorities, and even content agendas, contributing to the production and democratic management of these media. By: Mohammed Omar.

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